How to Get More Women to Apply to Speak at a Conference

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I’ll be holding a pre-conference workshop on Augmented and Virtual Realities in ELT this year and the line-up is not gender-balanced (12 presenters and two are women). I decided to apply because I knew that women usually do not present at these edtech workshops. I submitted my proposal, it was accepted, and I’ll be presenting!

I sent a message to EVECalendar (Equal Voices in ELT) on their Facebook page and asked them to help me find ways how to get more women to apply to speak at a conference, especially CALL-related conferences which are mainly male-dominant, as I am in touch with some conference organizers who really want to make their conferences gender balanced. Then, Fiona Mauchline (@fionamau), co-founder of EVECalendar, responded on Twitter, mentioned her colleagues, and we had a chat about this topic:

Here is a summary of the chat.

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Sue Lyon-Jones (@esolcourses_sue)

How about not expecting people to ‘pay to present’? For people who aren’t funded, the cost of attending conferences can be a barrier to participation. Presenting at conferences can add to the cost, both directly and indirectly – particularly for freelancers.

Andy Hockley (@adhockley)

  1. Encourage women directly (when you meet someone doing interesting work, ask them to consider speaking, telling others).
  2. If they are nervous about presenting, give them support, advice. The IATEFL Leadership and Management SIG (LAMSIG) had a webinar with the FairList on this: 
  3. If there are “cultural barriers” to women travelling to conferences (for example), try and make the conferences go to different places. If they can’t come to conferences, can conferences come to them? 
  4. Don’t be afraid to use affirmative action. If you have to choose between two talks to include on the programme, and there isn’t much between them, choose the one given by a woman.

Sophia Mavridi (@SophiaMav)

There ARE indeed fewer women in tech. It’s usually men who put themselves forward, write books, become “names” and plenary speakers. Two reasons in my opinion:

  1. The “male computer geek” stereotype and unconscious bias. It starts at school and continuous indefinitely. The edtech expert has to prove her “geeky” self all the time.
  2. The fear of being a minority in an environment that is notoriously male-dominated is another serious barrier for many female colleagues. You have to become comfortable with it otherwise you just won’t survive.

As a conference organiser, I have to admit it is not always easy to find edtech women speakers. It takes conscious and ongoing effort but that’s the only way to make things happen. we DO need more women in edtech: Plenary speakers, book writers, app developers, and consultants.

And we do need to spread the word and have more discussions like this one and like the super #EVELT tweetchat organised by EVE (@eve_elt) and IATEFL LT SIG (@iatefl_ltsig). You can find some highlights from #EVELT here.

I think it starts from plenary speakers lineups. They’re usually male dominated (few women experts/ book writers etc in edtech and other reasons I mentioned earlier) so you need to make a conscious effort as an organiser.

If women see that plenary lineups are more balanced and there are more and more women who are acknowledged and appreciated as edtech experts, they are more likely to put themselves forward as speakers.

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I’d like to thank Fiona, Sue, Andy, and Sophia for sharing their thoughts. If you are reading this and have an idea to share about how to have female speakers on conference stages, please leave a comment. Thank you.

Peace

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Here are more comments:

Nicola Prentis (@NicolaPrentis)

If they’re the primary childcarer, ask if you can help with childcare for the day. It might only mean designating one person to stand with a baby at the back of the room for the talk. It might mean a creche. Cover the child’s airfare if needed. Realise this can be a barrier.

TESOL MWIS (@TESOLMWIS)

In general, the process of how one to become plenary or featured speaker is opaque. I know people who just seem to get invited because they are well-known, and others petition for years to be invited to speak at conferences. So maybe speakers can share how they got to be speakers?

Efi Tzouri (@efitzouri)

My personal experience has shown that women’s determination is the greatest source of inspiration!


Fiona Mauchline (@fionamau)

Thinking about it, many of the more prominent women in ELT/EdTech are from or in Greece…. you must be doing something right 🙂 Perhaps it’s a sense of community that helps and encourages?

Here are the answers to Fiona’s question for Greence-based ELT researchers:

Julie Moore (@lexicojules)

I’m speaking at a corpus linguistics conf next month, includes some ELT and I’d def say tech-ish … 2 out of 3 plenaries are female and at a rough glance, probably more female than male speakers overall.

Dimitris Primalis (@dprimalis)

We have a good record in Greece! As Tesol Greece chairman, I invited Eva Buyuksimkesyan to present on LT on TG’s very first webinar in 2013. The tradition continues with many excellent women LT speakers, some of whom often present at big international conferences .

Inviting excellent teachers to share their experience with the rest of the community encourages them to present their work. It usually takes one or two presentations and after that they act autonomously.

ChristinaC (@Kryftina)

We do see many women here giving f2f talks & workshops on tech/elt. I think encouragement starts during training and shapes further during practice. 

Community is certainly very strong here and there is great support, both from associations and individuals 🙂

jenjdobson (@jenjdobson)

There’s quite a lot of healthy debate currently about positive discrimination in ELT. I ‘grew up’ as a young adult in a 1980s London culture when this was the norm in my work circles. Am slightly perplexed why people don’t get it. #elttechwomen

Also use #womenintech just got retweeted by @womentechbot created by @sarahmorris926. Maybe outside of ELT they can give us some insights?

 

 

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Diversity at JALT and the JALT Code of Conduct

Diversity at JALT and the JALT Code of ConductAdd subheading

After this incident my life changed completely. Now, I actively give talks about the real Iran and the Iranian people behind the news, and blog about the Iranian identity at https://beyondyourstereotypes.wordpress.com/. I am dealing with smiling depression and social anxiety. To heal myself and learn how to respond to micro/macroaggressions, I participate in events/workshops on harassment. I became an active member of JALT GALE SIG. I joined SIETAR Japan. So, I am trying to create something positive out of a horrible experience.

BTW, I added “An Equity Advocate” to the title of my blog, and a couple of emojis to my Twitter account! I also tweet randomly and quite irrelevantly about the unseen Iran!

I just finished writing a report on Gifu JALT event in January 2018 about diversity at JALT and the JALT Code of Conduct, which was developed due to several unpleasant incidents at JALT conferences (including the incident that happened to me –> That was the reason I did not quit JALT and decided to stick around and make little changes, and I am pushing myself to feel belonged to JALT, as inclusion is not the same as involvement).

Gifu JALT

Here are my sketchnotes:

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p.s. Recently, I have realized that there is no “JALT National Conference” but there is a “JALT International Conference”! Well, it is time to dispel stereotypes about JATL, too 😉 I am working on that 🙂

Here is the link to the report in JALT GALE Newsletter:

http://gale-sig.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Spring-Gale-Newsletter-2018-May-16-FINAL-small-5.31.pdf

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The Mental Health of English Language Teachers: Research Findings

I am not alone! 🙂

Teacher Phili

This is an extensive summary of the original research I carried out in December 2017.  It is published to coincide with a 30 minute talk at the IATEFL (International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language) conference, in Brighton on 10 April 2018. It is my first ever presentation at any ELT conference.

Click here for a .pdf version of this post

Click here for a 25 minute, pre-recorded version of the presentation

Click here for the final slides

The focus of my talk, ‘Improving the mental health of English language teachers’ changed somewhat when I received such an overwhelming response to my survey.  I carried out a pilot using a small sample of five people – the week before it went live.  I received 156 responses in just the first 24 hours of it being published on 1 December.  I closed the survey after three weeks, having…

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The ELT Movements I Support

I’m a conference goer, and I’ve decided to put the logos of the following movements on my poster or in my last slide and introduce them to my audience. I contacted them and they kindly allowed me to do so.

  1. ELTtoo To raise awareness against harassment & bulling in ELT
  2. TEFL Equity Advocates and Academy To speak out for equality in ELT
  3. EVE: Equal Voices in ELT To recognize both gender and NNS/NS parity in ELT conferences and events

Here is my last slide at the Tottori JALT event:

Being an Iranian Woman Today

Yesterday I contacted EVE and asked about PanSIG2018’s plenary speakers’ line-up. I am happy to announce that PanSIG2018 qualified for a purple (the Gender Balance) EVE and was included in the EVE calendar:
JALTPanSIG2018

MAVR Presence at JALT2017

Mixed, Augmented, and Virtual Realities (MAVR) (1)

Photo created by Canva

JALT MAVR SIG had (1) its first forum, MAVR SIG Showcase: Research, Projects, and Demos, (2) MAVR​ ​SIG​ ​Table, (3) Partnership​ ​Booth, and (4) After​ ​Party​ ​Gaming.

 

MAVR SIG Showcase: Research, Projects, and Demos

Digital content and the internet jumped into our pockets with smartphones. Now digital content is jumping back out of our pockets through mixed, augmented, and virtual realities. The MAVR team presented on different research topics and demoed some MAVR projects.

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Here are my slides on “A Virtual Trip to the Unseen Iran”

 

MAVR​ ​SIG​ ​Table

We had a table in the SIG room and introduced our research group and projects.

MAVR Flyer (A4)_001

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Partnership​ ​Booth

Cengage Learning partnered with us to create an AR experience to showcase their
TED textbook line. You can find your pics here: 

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After​ ​Party​ ​Gaming

We rented a space, had a few drinks, and played some VR/AR games.

FB 360 Photo

Below are the highlights from MAVR presence at #JALT2017 – Included are our SIG Table, our SIG Forum, Poster and Oral Presentations, and our partnership with Nat Geo Learning (video created by Eric).

Tech Tools from JALT2017 Technology in Teaching (TnT) Workshops

happy birthday, taurus!

In this blog post, I share the tools which were introduced at the JALT2017 Technology In Teaching (TnT) Workshops that I attended.

Utilizing Free Online Tools to Teach Vocabulary by Charles Browne

  1. The New General Service: http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org/
  2. The Business Service List: http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org/bsl-business-service-list/
  3. The TOEIC Service List: http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org/toeic-list/
  4. A New Academic Word List: http://www.newacademicwordlist.org/
  5. The Online Graded Text Editor: https://www.er-central.com/ogte/
  6. VocabProfile: https://www.lextutor.ca/vp/eng/
  7. Kahoot!: https://kahoot.it/
  8. NGSL Builder app: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ngsl-builder/id892335804?mt=8 
  9. Quizlet: https://quizlet.com/
  10. Memrise: https://www.memrise.com/
  11. Not free: https://www.cooori.com/
  12. EnglishCentral: https://www.englishcentral.com/videos
  13. WordLearner: http://www.wordlearner.com/
  14. Cooori: https://www.cooori.com/

Using Moodle to Foster Student Collaboration by Mark deBoer

  1. Moodle: https://moodle.org/
  2. Learn Moodle Mooc: https://learn.moodle.net/

Cloud’s Eye View of Google: What It Can Do for You by Rab Paterson

  1. Chrome Web Store: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/extensions
  2. Quick Tabs: https://goo.gl/czBRRN
  3. Unpaywall: http://unpaywall.org/
  4. Disconnect: https://disconnect.me/ 
  5. Google for Education: https://edu.google.com/
  6. Google Educator Groups (GEGs): https://www.google.com/landing/geg/
  7. GEG West Tokyo: https://plus.google.com/communities/106362051384466222126
  8. GEG Osaka Japan: https://plus.google.com/communities/107952944344432280617
  9. Google Sites: https://sites.google.com/
  10. Google Docs: https://docs.google.com/
  11. Google URL Shortener: https://goo.gl/
  12. Bitly: https://bitly.com/
  13. Zotero: https://www.zotero.org/
  14. App Launcher Customizer for Google™: https://goo.gl/QPb7Fy

Here are my sketchnotes from JALT2017 Technology In Teaching (TnT) Workshops:

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OUGEO Presence at JALT2017

Tech Resources from Osaka University Global English Online (OUGEO)

Photo created by Canva

Mehrasa and I had two poster presentations on our joint PhD project at JALT2017.

1. Multimodal e-Feedback in an Online English Course

As online English courses are growing in popularity exponentially in higher education, providing electronic feedback is also gaining currency, as students might feel disconnected, unengaged, and unsupported if they are not provided with effective feedback. The provision of electronic feedback can be enhanced through multimodality, particularly in asynchronous online environments. There are also a number of factors such as social presence and collaboration which are related to feedback effectiveness.

In this study, we explored the use of online interaction platforms available on Blackboard Learn and web-based tools such as VideoNot.es to provide multimodal electronic feedback in an online course of English for General Academic Purposes (EGAP), entitled Osaka University Global English Online (OUGEO). Additionally, we examined how Japanese learners of English perceive the multimodal electronic feedback they have received on their online writing and speaking tasks. We also investigated the perceived usefulness of the provided feedback in relation to learner collaboration and sense of presence in the online course. To collect data, we asked the participants to respond to a set of surveys and open-ended questions.

The findings indicated that the majority of students valued the multimodality of the feedback on their productive tasks. Furthermore, the students’ perception of social presence and collaboration was found to be related to their perception of feedback usefulness. Finally, we discussed the practical implications for providing effective online multimodal feedback as well as further facilitating collaborative online environments.

2. Developing a Blended Course: Why Quality Matters

In this poster presentation, we reported on the development, implementation, and evaluation phases of a blended course of English for general academic purposes targeting second-year undergraduate Japanese students at Osaka University. In general, the course aimed to develop students’ practical English skills to help them advance to higher levels of conversational and academic English up to B2 and C1 levels of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR).

The basic Successive Approximation Model proposed by Allen (2012) informed the design and development of the online course. In order to ensure course quality from the outset, we used the Quality Matters® Higher Education Rubric (Fifth Edition) as the major reference. The pedagogical practices within this fifteen-week course hinge on recent approaches in ELT, e.g., project-based language learning. As part of the evaluation process, we measured the students’ perception on the usefulness of the course quantitatively and qualitatively through an attitudinal survey instrument and open ended reflection questions. Furthermore, to deploy learning analytics, we analyzed the data generated by the learning management system Blackboard Learn, also known as CLE (Collaboration and Learning Environment) to further delve into students’ performance, track their progress, and provide insights into ways to improve it. Eventually, to examine learner achievement and the fulfillment of learning outcomes, we also examined the students’ scores on the placement test, weekly assigned tasks, as well as quizzes and the final exam.

 

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