MAVR Presence at JALT2017

Mixed, Augmented, and Virtual Realities (MAVR) (1)

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JALT MAVR SIG had (1) its first forum, MAVR SIG Showcase: Research, Projects, and Demos, (2) MAVR​ ​SIG​ ​Table, (3) Partnership​ ​Booth, and (4) After​ ​Party​ ​Gaming.

 

MAVR SIG Showcase: Research, Projects, and Demos

Digital content and the internet jumped into our pockets with smartphones. Now digital content is jumping back out of our pockets through mixed, augmented, and virtual realities. The MAVR team presented on different research topics and demoed some MAVR projects.

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Here are my slides on “A Virtual Trip to the Unseen Iran”

 

MAVR​ ​SIG​ ​Table

We had a table in the SIG room and introduced our research group and projects.

MAVR Flyer (A4)_001

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Partnership​ ​Booth

Cengage Learning partnered with us to create an AR experience to showcase their
TED textbook line. You can find your pics here: 

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After​ ​Party​ ​Gaming

We rented a space, had a few drinks, and played some VR/AR games.

FB 360 Photo

Below are the highlights from MAVR presence at #JALT2017 – Included are our SIG Table, our SIG Forum, Poster and Oral Presentations, and our partnership with Nat Geo Learning (video created by Eric).

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Tech Tools from JALT2017 Technology in Teaching (TnT) Workshops

happy birthday, taurus!

In this blog post, I share the tools which were introduced at the JALT2017 Technology In Teaching (TnT) Workshops that I attended.

Utilizing Free Online Tools to Teach Vocabulary by Charles Browne

  1. The New General Service: http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org/
  2. The Business Service List: http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org/bsl-business-service-list/
  3. The TOEIC Service List: http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org/toeic-list/
  4. A New Academic Word List: http://www.newacademicwordlist.org/
  5. The Online Graded Text Editor: https://www.er-central.com/ogte/
  6. VocabProfile: https://www.lextutor.ca/vp/eng/
  7. Kahoot!: https://kahoot.it/
  8. NGSL Builder app: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ngsl-builder/id892335804?mt=8 
  9. Quizlet: https://quizlet.com/
  10. Memrise: https://www.memrise.com/
  11. Not free: https://www.cooori.com/
  12. EnglishCentral: https://www.englishcentral.com/videos
  13. WordLearner: http://www.wordlearner.com/
  14. Cooori: https://www.cooori.com/

Using Moodle to Foster Student Collaboration by Mark deBoer

  1. Moodle: https://moodle.org/
  2. Learn Moodle Mooc: https://learn.moodle.net/

Cloud’s Eye View of Google: What It Can Do for You by Rab Paterson

  1. Chrome Web Store: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/extensions
  2. Quick Tabs: https://goo.gl/czBRRN
  3. Unpaywall: http://unpaywall.org/
  4. Disconnect: https://disconnect.me/ 
  5. Google for Education: https://edu.google.com/
  6. Google Educator Groups (GEGs): https://www.google.com/landing/geg/
  7. GEG West Tokyo: https://plus.google.com/communities/106362051384466222126
  8. GEG Osaka Japan: https://plus.google.com/communities/107952944344432280617
  9. Google Sites: https://sites.google.com/
  10. Google Docs: https://docs.google.com/
  11. Google URL Shortener: https://goo.gl/
  12. Bitly: https://bitly.com/
  13. Zotero: https://www.zotero.org/
  14. App Launcher Customizer for Google™: https://goo.gl/QPb7Fy

Here are my sketchnotes from JALT2017 Technology In Teaching (TnT) Workshops:

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OUGEO Presence at JALT2017

Tech Resources from Osaka University Global English Online (OUGEO)

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Mehrasa and I had two poster presentations on our joint PhD project at JALT2017.

1. Multimodal e-Feedback in an Online English Course

As online English courses are growing in popularity exponentially in higher education, providing electronic feedback is also gaining currency, as students might feel disconnected, unengaged, and unsupported if they are not provided with effective feedback. The provision of electronic feedback can be enhanced through multimodality, particularly in asynchronous online environments. There are also a number of factors such as social presence and collaboration which are related to feedback effectiveness.

In this study, we explored the use of online interaction platforms available on Blackboard Learn and web-based tools such as VideoNot.es to provide multimodal electronic feedback in an online course of English for General Academic Purposes (EGAP), entitled Osaka University Global English Online (OUGEO). Additionally, we examined how Japanese learners of English perceive the multimodal electronic feedback they have received on their online writing and speaking tasks. We also investigated the perceived usefulness of the provided feedback in relation to learner collaboration and sense of presence in the online course. To collect data, we asked the participants to respond to a set of surveys and open-ended questions.

The findings indicated that the majority of students valued the multimodality of the feedback on their productive tasks. Furthermore, the students’ perception of social presence and collaboration was found to be related to their perception of feedback usefulness. Finally, we discussed the practical implications for providing effective online multimodal feedback as well as further facilitating collaborative online environments.

2. Developing a Blended Course: Why Quality Matters

In this poster presentation, we reported on the development, implementation, and evaluation phases of a blended course of English for general academic purposes targeting second-year undergraduate Japanese students at Osaka University. In general, the course aimed to develop students’ practical English skills to help them advance to higher levels of conversational and academic English up to B2 and C1 levels of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR).

The basic Successive Approximation Model proposed by Allen (2012) informed the design and development of the online course. In order to ensure course quality from the outset, we used the Quality Matters® Higher Education Rubric (Fifth Edition) as the major reference. The pedagogical practices within this fifteen-week course hinge on recent approaches in ELT, e.g., project-based language learning. As part of the evaluation process, we measured the students’ perception on the usefulness of the course quantitatively and qualitatively through an attitudinal survey instrument and open ended reflection questions. Furthermore, to deploy learning analytics, we analyzed the data generated by the learning management system Blackboard Learn, also known as CLE (Collaboration and Learning Environment) to further delve into students’ performance, track their progress, and provide insights into ways to improve it. Eventually, to examine learner achievement and the fulfillment of learning outcomes, we also examined the students’ scores on the placement test, weekly assigned tasks, as well as quizzes and the final exam.

 

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A Trip to the HeART of the Unseen Iran via the VR Empathy Machine

 

Iran

I came to Japan in 2015 to do my PhD, and I realized in the first few days of living here that there are certain stereotypes about the Middle East, especially about Iran. This is why I actively give talks about the real Iran and the Iranian people behind the news, and blog about the Iranian identity at beyondyourstereotypes.wordpress.com (“I Am More Than A Stereotype”).

In my classes, I always allocate one whole session to introduce my country, and this helps me establish my identity and help my students see and perceive me as I perceive myself.

Here is my ELT chalkboard on Iran on the first day of my English Conversation (英語会話) class at Konan Women’s University.

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One of my MAVR teammates, Chris Hastings, who knows about my presentations on Iran, kindly contacted me. Here is a part of his email:

I want to help you add a VR component to your talks/workshops about Iran. I think your efforts to normalize ideas about Iran and squash ridiculous stereotypes are really admirably, and something I want to help with. So, I’m suggesting possibly adding a VR segment to one of your workshops that uses Google Streetview, Google Expeditions, or maybe even a VR movie about Iran. I think this would be really powerful in combination with your words. I recently heard a quote about VR being called an ‘empathy machine’ and it made me think about you and your recent efforts regarding “I Am More Than A Stereotype”.

This semester, I have five classes: Three classes at Konan Women’s University  (English at KonanWU) and two classes at Kobe Women’s University (English at KobeWU). Travel is the theme of all the textbooks that I teach. So, I took this opportunity and planned a virtual trip to the unseen Iran through little but powerful empathy machine. In our recent email exchange, Chris shared a TED Talk with me, titled “How Virtual Reality Can Create the Ultimate Empathy Machine”. It’s probably where the phrase ‘ultimate empathy machine’ was coined. Chris Milk, the speaker is adding ‘ultimate’ to what the film critic Roger Ebert originally said about movies being like ‘machines that generate empathy’.

I ordered seven Google Cardboards on Amazon and I contacted Chris to pick his brain about the VR integration into my lesson plan. According to him, the best app he has worked with so far is Google Streetview because it is simple and easy to use. He said, the only problem was maybe not a lot of content for Iran. He kindly shared a website which has a VR section on Iran: https://persiaport.com/en/hashtag/virtualreality. It has a lot of content and can be accessed on mobile devices and is compatible with Google Cardboard.

Then, he further explained that if you have your own 360 photos, you could use a service like https://roundme.com/ to upload them to and create a simple tour. There is a free version with somewhat limited functionality which will allow you to do this. It’s also really simple to use. If you want to get serious about making your own tours, then I recommend – https://ggnome.com/pano2vr. If there 360 images on Google Streetview you want to edit / upload to your own platform / make part of a tour, you can use this free software Streetviewgrabber – http://www.purebasic.fr/english/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=50248 (using Google’s photos for educational purposes is OK).

I decided to start with PersiaPort and 360cities  3D images of Iran . I created QR codes for each photo. As homework, I asked my students to find a tourist destination in Iran and bring a photo to the class (digital or in print).

 

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Many students found Nasir ol Molk Mosque as a tourist attraction in Iran. So, I decided to take them there! I also chose Masouleh, a village on the rooftops located in the north of Iran. I divided the students into groups and asked them to describe what they could see in English. We were at the heART of Nasir ol Molk Mosque and Masouleh village, and the classroom was filled with “wow moments”. Some of the students started walking around to be able to see the entire captured scene.

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Here are the QR codes and group number signs in Persian style.

Finally, I got the students to write a paragraph about their VR experience and their trip to Iran. In total, 65 students took a virtual trip to Iran. Here are some of their comments:

I’m planning to make the VR task more complicated for the future virtual trips to the real Iran. I am also going to add Tehrangeles to the activity to take the students to Little Persia in the US. In this way, I can also go there and overcome the travel ban with the help of VR 🙂

Here are my slides on “A Virtual Trip to the Unseen Iran” as part of the MAVR SIG Forum at JALT2017: