Behind-the-Scenes Google Site and Two Hashtags for OUGEO

OUGEO

Photo created by Canva

One of the reasons I don’t consider doing my PhD in Japan as a waste of time is that I learned how to define, manage, organize, and track projects.

My PhD project is focused on designing, developing, implementing, and evaluating an EGAP (English for General Academic Purposes) online course, entitled Osaka University Global English Online (OUGEO), targeting Japanese learners at Osaka University. Based on a needs analysis, the course was designed and developed guided by theoretical frameworks and models for online course design. OUGEO was implemented in the spring semester of 2017 (April–July), and offered at three levels (elementary, intermediate, and upper intermediate), each level containing 10 online and 5 face-to-face sessions.

To track the project and record what was happening in the process of designing, developing, implementing, and evaluating the course, I created a behind-the-scenes Google site for OUGEO. Here is the link to the site:

https://sites.google.com/view/ougeo

I also used two hashtags on Twitter to microblog about the OUGEO project and share its instructional materials:

OUGEO PRESENCE AT JALT CALL 2017

Poster, JALT CALL

Poster available on academia

In our poster presentation at JALT CALL 2017, Mehrasa and I focused on the design and development phases of an online course of English for General Academic Purposes (EGAP), which we have referred to as Osaka University Global English Online (OUGEO).

Initially, we reviewed two mainstream models of instructional design for online course delivery—namely, ADDIE and SAM. The ADDIE model is a generic, systematic, linear, step-by-step process, known as waterfall model, which consists of five ordered phases: (1) Analysis, (2) Design, (3) Development, (4) Implementation, and (5) Evaluation.

xuycbhzq_ADDIE_Waterfall

Photo source: https://goo.gl/UxisAn

Unlike ADDIE’s five giant sequential steps, SAM (Successive Approximation Model) is an iterative, cyclical, and agile approach to instructional design which tries to address the roadblocks in the way of instructional designers in repeated small steps.

leaving-addie-for-sam-19-728

Photo source: https://goo.gl/3JF7om

Following that, we explained the intertwined design and development phases of our prospective online course, which include the following: Assessing students’ needs and technological skills, defining the course overall goal and learning objectives, determining online course technologies, requirements, accessibility, connectivity, and support system, developing course syllabus, instructional materials (available via these hashtags: #OsakaUniversityGlobalEnglishOnline #OUGEO), tasks and activities, objective-based assessment, management strategies for team teaching, and formative and summative course evaluation. We also discussed copyright restrictions, the use of Open Educational Resources (OERs), as well as several e-learning authoring tools and their merits and demerits. Finally, we touched upon issues related to quality assurance with reference to the Quality Matters Higher Education Rubric.

5

OUGEO Presence at Osaka JALT Back to School 2017

Back to School 2017

Despite the rapid growth of online teaching and learning at institutes of higher education worldwide, switching to online courses can pose a great challenge to those involved in creating and administering them. In our presentation at Osaka JALT Back to School 2017, Mehrasa and I tried to simplify, clarify, and exemplify the process of online course design.

We focused on practices that we found successful in designing online English courses based on the related literature and our hands-on experience as online instructional designers.

Under the project title of Osaka University Global English Online (OUGEO), we designed and developed, and are now implementing, a blended course of English for General Academic Purposes (EGAP) at Osaka University targeting second-year undergraduate students for a period of 15 weeks, of which 10 sessions are purely online and 5 sessions are face-to-face.

First, we reviewed popular instructional design models like ADDIE and SAM. We also discussed topics such as online syllabus, learning management systems, e-learning authoring tools, online visual design, e-assessment, and e-feedback. Finally, we introduced the most practical standards checklists for online course self-evaluation: The Standards Checklist by Marjorie Vai and Kristen Sosulski (2011) and Quality Matters Higher Education Course Design Rubric Standards, Fifth Edition (2014).

Slides: Online Course Design 101: All You Need to Know to Get Started